Discussion:
Laser survey finds 61,000 Maya structures.
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Horace LaBadie
2018-09-28 02:39:01 UTC
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The 2016 scans of Guatemala have been published, and evidence of a
complex, interconnected series of settlements has been compiled.


<https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2018/09/27/this-major-discovery-u
pends-long-held-theories-about-maya-civilization/?utm_term=.c95ce589b90e>

Combing through the scans, Acuña and her colleagues, an international
18-strong scientific team, tallied 61,480 structures. These included: 60
miles of causeways, roads and canals that connected cities; large maize
farms; houses large and small; and, surprisingly, defensive
fortifications that suggest the Maya came under attack from the west of
Central America.

³We were all humbled,² said Tulane University anthropologist Marcello
Canuto, the study¹s lead author. ³All of us saw things we had walked
over and we realized, oh wow, we totally missed that.²

[...]

Beneath the thick jungle, ruins appeared. Lots and lots of them.
Extrapolated over the 36,700 square miles, which encompasses the total
Maya lowland region, the authors estimate the Maya built as many as 2.7
million structures. These would have supported 7 million to 11 million
people during the Classic Period of Maya civilization, around the years
650 to 800, in line with other Maya population estimates.

³We¹ve been working in this area for over a century,² Canuto said. ³It¹s
not terra incognita, but we didn¹t have a good appreciation for what was
really there.²
Jes Me
2018-09-28 07:47:39 UTC
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On Thu, 27 Sep 2018 22:39:01 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Combing through the scans, Acuña and her colleagues, an international
18-strong scientific team, tallied 61,480 structures.
Been several recent TV Docus on this project, and other related ones.

Newest estimates are that there could have been
10 million people inhabiting the Mayan world.
g.jackmond@nus.edu.ws
2018-10-11 19:44:30 UTC
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12 October 2018:
Meso America is not the only place where LiDAR has revolutionized archaeology.
Recently with the processing of the 2015 LiDAR from the Independent State of Samoa (South Pacific) finds similar to those described by LaBadie below have come to light. The results are not only similarly spectacular but also potentially history changing for not only Samoa but the entire Pacific.
The Centre for Samoan Studies / National University would like to announce that the CSS Archaeological LiDAR Map Server is finally up and running at:
http://samoanstudies.ws/AFCP/MapServer/
We have also put a link to the map server on the Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ACH) web page (http://samoanstudies.ws/AFCP).
The map server consists of a publicly view-able collection of the Archaeological LiDAR images and aerial photos of the Independent State of Samoa (Upolu, Manono, Apolima, Savaii) taken in 2015 and processed in 2017 along with background information on this previously under-reported archaeological and cultural heritage treasure (see web page for more detail).
We hope that this small step will rekindle a long ignored interest in Samoan archaeology.
Post by Horace LaBadie
The 2016 scans of Guatemala have been published, and evidence of a
complex, interconnected series of settlements has been compiled.
<https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2018/09/27/this-major-discovery-u
pends-long-held-theories-about-maya-civilization/?utm_term=.c95ce589b90e>
Combing through the scans, Acuńa and her colleagues, an international
18-strong scientific team, tallied 61,480 structures. These included: 60
miles of causeways, roads and canals that connected cities; large maize
farms; houses large and small; and, surprisingly, defensive
fortifications that suggest the Maya came under attack from the west of
Central America.
łWe were all humbled,˛ said Tulane University anthropologist Marcello
Canuto, the studyąs lead author. łAll of us saw things we had walked
over and we realized, oh wow, we totally missed that.˛
[...]
Beneath the thick jungle, ruins appeared. Lots and lots of them.
Extrapolated over the 36,700 square miles, which encompasses the total
Maya lowland region, the authors estimate the Maya built as many as 2.7
million structures. These would have supported 7 million to 11 million
people during the Classic Period of Maya civilization, around the years
650 to 800, in line with other Maya population estimates.
łWeąve been working in this area for over a century,˛ Canuto said. łItąs
not terra incognita, but we didnąt have a good appreciation for what was
really there.˛
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