Discussion:
Mass Viking age burial site in Repton confirmed.
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Horace LaBadie
2018-02-03 04:34:13 UTC
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Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age

A suspected Viking mass burial site, uncovered in the 1970s and 1980s,
has been confirmed to ne from the late 9th Century by new dating
techniques, and was probably associated with the Viking Great Army.

<https://phys.org/news/2018-02-radiocarbon-dating-reveals-mass-grave.html
"A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of
Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered
that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may
have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.

Although the remains were initially thought to be associated with the
Vikings, radiocarbon dates seemed to suggest the grave consisted of
bones collected over several centuries. New scientific research now
shows that this was not the case and that the bones are all consistent
with a date in the late 9th century. Historical records state that the
Viking Great Army wintered in Repton, Derbyshire, in 873 A.D. and drove
the Mercian king into exile.

Excavations led by archaeologists Martin Biddle and Birthe Kjlbye-Biddle
at St Wystan's Church in Repton in the 1970s and 1980s discovered
several Viking graves and a charnel deposit of nearly 300 people
underneath a shallow mound in the vicarage garden.

The mound appears to have been a burial monument linked to the Great
Army."
d***@gmail.com
2018-02-03 20:34:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
A suspected Viking mass burial site, uncovered in the 1970s and 1980s,
has been confirmed to ne from the late 9th Century by new dating
techniques, and was probably associated with the Viking Great Army.
<https://phys.org/news/2018-02-radiocarbon-dating-reveals-mass-grave.html
"A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of
Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered
that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may
have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.
Although the remains were initially thought to be associated with the
Vikings, radiocarbon dates seemed to suggest the grave consisted of
bones collected over several centuries. New scientific research now
shows that this was not the case and that the bones are all consistent
with a date in the late 9th century. Historical records state that the
Viking Great Army wintered in Repton, Derbyshire, in 873 A.D. and drove
the Mercian king into exile.
Excavations led by archaeologists Martin Biddle and Birthe Kjlbye-Biddle
at St Wystan's Church in Repton in the 1970s and 1980s discovered
several Viking graves and a charnel deposit of nearly 300 people
underneath a shallow mound in the vicarage garden.
The mound appears to have been a burial monument linked to the Great
Army."
Who died, Vikings or their victims?
Horace LaBadie
2018-02-03 22:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@gmail.com
Post by Horace LaBadie
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
A suspected Viking mass burial site, uncovered in the 1970s and 1980s,
has been confirmed to ne from the late 9th Century by new dating
techniques, and was probably associated with the Viking Great Army.
<https://phys.org/news/2018-02-radiocarbon-dating-reveals-mass-grave.html
"A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of
Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered
that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may
have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.
Although the remains were initially thought to be associated with the
Vikings, radiocarbon dates seemed to suggest the grave consisted of
bones collected over several centuries. New scientific research now
shows that this was not the case and that the bones are all consistent
with a date in the late 9th century. Historical records state that the
Viking Great Army wintered in Repton, Derbyshire, in 873 A.D. and drove
the Mercian king into exile.
Excavations led by archaeologists Martin Biddle and Birthe Kjlbye-Biddle
at St Wystan's Church in Repton in the 1970s and 1980s discovered
several Viking graves and a charnel deposit of nearly 300 people
underneath a shallow mound in the vicarage garden.
The mound appears to have been a burial monument linked to the Great
Army."
Who died, Vikings or their victims?
It was the late 9th Century, so, everybody.

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