Discussion:
Arizona archaeological sites threatened by border wall.
(too old to reply)
Horace LaBadie
2019-09-17 18:59:56 UTC
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It was inevitable. Twenty-two sites in protected areas are threatened by
construction of the wall along the US-Mexico international border.

Border fence construction could destroy archaeological sites, National
Park Service finds

<https://beta.washingtonpost.com/immigration/border-fence-construction-co
uld-destroy-archaeological-sites-national-park-service-finds/2019/09/17/3
5338b18-d64b-11e9-9343-40db57cf6abd_story.html#comments-wrapper>

"The bulldozers and excavators rushing to install President Trump¹s
border fence could damage or destroy up to 22 archaeological sites
within Arizona¹s Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in coming months,
according to an internal National Park Service report obtained by The
Washington Post.

The 123-page report, completed in July and obtained via the Freedom of
Information Act, indicates that the administration¹s plan to convert an
existing five-foot-high vehicle barrier to a 30-foot steel edifice could
pose irreparable harm to unexcavated remnants of ancient Sonoran Desert
peoples. Experts identified these risks as U.S. Customs and Border
Protection seeks to fast-track the pace of construction to meet Trump¹s
campaign pledge of completing 500 miles of barrier by next year¹s
election."

[...]

"Environmental groups have fought unsuccessfully to halt construction in
the protected areas, arguing that more-imposing barriers could disrupt
wildlife migration corridors and threaten the survival of imperiled
species.

But to date, there has been little mention of the potential damage to
archaeological sites, where stone tools, ceramic shards and other
pre-Colombian artifacts are extremely well-preserved in the arid
environment. Desert-dwelling peoples have populated the area for at
least 16,000 years, particularly in the area around the oasis of
Quitobaquito Springs in the national monument, one of the few places
where the Quitobaquito pupfish and the endangered Sonoyta mud turtle
still live in the wild.

The oasis was part of a prehistoric trade route, the Old Salt Trail,
where northern Mexican commodities including salt, obsidian and
seashells were plentiful, according to the Park Service. The traders
were followed by Spanish missionaries, Western settlers, and other
travelers and nomads who came to drink."
JTEM
2019-09-18 00:09:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
It was inevitable. Twenty-two sites in protected areas are threatened by
construction of the wall along the US-Mexico international border.
So a wall that doesn't exist threatens sites.

Hmm.









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