Discussion:
Pre Clovis: jeeze, people, it's the Continental Shelf
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JTEM
2018-10-27 04:56:12 UTC
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http://www.virginiaplaces.org/boundaries/ocs.html

The context is here:

http://www.sfu.museum/journey/an-en/postsecondaire-postsecondary/preclovis

And I quote...

: Despite Monte Verde's widespread acceptance as a legitimate
: "pre-Clovis" archaeological site, many questions about an
: early settlement of the Americas remain unanswered. How did
: people travel all the way from Beringia to southern Chile
: by 12,500 years BP? Why have no significant traces of their
: journey been found? If people were established in the
: Americas prior to 11,500 years BP, why have so few
: undisputed "pre-Clovis" sites been found?

The point, children, is that the "ice age" ended, it was
getting warmer and the glaciers were retreating. People
could suddenly get here by foot. But then the "Younger
Dryas cooling" began, everything fell into reverse for over
a thousand years, and then it all happened again... the
glaciers started to retreat and people could walk here.

There. But before that happened the only way to get here was
by boat. The only people coming here were those following
the coast, and the coast wasn't where it is today. Which,
by the way, is why I introduced the Continental Shelf.

No, the entire continental shelf wasn't exposed. But a lot
more of it was. And as these were water people -- folks who
traveled by boat, presumably living off the water -- that
is where they were; on the now submerged coast.

It's no secret!

But this also means that people were probably arriving here
from other places. Perhaps Europe, Africa or even coming
across the pacific being pushed by El Nino "like" currents...

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/297/5579/226.full

The point is, of course, once we understand that people
were arriving here across the water we have to accept
that we're not talking about a single homogeneous group,
and the Special Snowflakes try to enforce.

Nope.

I mean, the "Technology" seems to have already existed
in the Mediterranean 100k years ago, the distances were
shorter, there were more island so... yeah... if people
could (and they could) they did. Period.

And they did.

But if we want to find those people then the first thing
we've got to do is start looking for them. They lived
were the coast used to be, so that's where we need to
look.







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http://jtem.tumblr.com/post/179464208113
d***@gmail.com
2018-11-15 22:22:20 UTC
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Post by JTEM
http://www.virginiaplaces.org/boundaries/ocs.html
http://www.sfu.museum/journey/an-en/postsecondaire-postsecondary/preclovis
And I quote...
: Despite Monte Verde's widespread acceptance as a legitimate
: "pre-Clovis" archaeological site, many questions about an
: early settlement of the Americas remain unanswered. How did
: people travel all the way from Beringia to southern Chile
: by 12,500 years BP? Why have no significant traces of their
: journey been found? If people were established in the
: Americas prior to 11,500 years BP, why have so few
: undisputed "pre-Clovis" sites been found?
The point, children, is that the "ice age" ended, it was
getting warmer and the glaciers were retreating. People
could suddenly get here by foot. But then the "Younger
Dryas cooling" began, everything fell into reverse for over
a thousand years, and then it all happened again... the
glaciers started to retreat and people could walk here.
There. But before that happened the only way to get here was
by boat. The only people coming here were those following
the coast, and the coast wasn't where it is today. Which,
by the way, is why I introduced the Continental Shelf.
No, the entire continental shelf wasn't exposed. But a lot
more of it was. And as these were water people -- folks who
traveled by boat, presumably living off the water -- that
is where they were; on the now submerged coast.
It's no secret!
But this also means that people were probably arriving here
from other places. Perhaps Europe, Africa or even coming
across the pacific being pushed by El Nino "like" currents...
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/297/5579/226.full
The point is, of course, once we understand that people
were arriving here across the water we have to accept
that we're not talking about a single homogeneous group,
and the Special Snowflakes try to enforce.
Nope.
I mean, the "Technology" seems to have already existed
in the Mediterranean 100k years ago, the distances were
shorter, there were more island so... yeah... if people
could (and they could) they did. Period.
And they did.
But if we want to find those people then the first thing
we've got to do is start looking for them. They lived
were the coast used to be, so that's where we need to
look.
Who let the troll out again?

No boats except from Papua after 45ka. The Med islands had sharp rocks, geofacts, not tools.
JTEM
2018-11-15 22:31:35 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
Who let the troll out again?
I'm thinking your nurse, that she felt sorry for you,
thought you needed the fresh air.






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http://jtem.tumblr.com/post/180129334168
d***@gmail.com
2018-11-20 00:46:25 UTC
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Post by JTEM
Post by d***@gmail.com
Who let the troll out again?
I'm thinking
New hobby?
JTEM
2018-11-20 02:25:55 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
New hobby?
If you want to look slightly desperate you could try
to participate in a conversation, instead of leaping
immediately to the (f)Lames.

Just saying.






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http://jtem.tumblr.com/post/180284066003
George
2018-11-20 19:10:52 UTC
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On Mon, 19 Nov 2018 18:25:55 -0800 (PST)
Post by JTEM
Post by d***@gmail.com
New hobby?
If you want to look slightly desperate you could try
to participate in a conversation, instead of leaping
immediately to the (f)Lames.
Just saying.
You realise now that you're going to have to explain the cunning bit to
the uneducated clown


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