Discussion:
Norway¹s Melting Glaciers Release Over 2,000 Artifacts
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Horace LaBadie
2018-01-27 16:25:35 UTC
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Melting Norwegian glaciers release thousands of artifacts, some trapped
in ice for 6,000 years.

<https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/2000-artifacts-pulled-edge-nor
ways-melting-glaciers-180967949/>

"Glaciers and permafrost hold many of these treasures, but as climate
changes they¹re releasing their haul to the elements. And as Kastalia
Medrano at Newsweek reports, this is exactly what¹s happening in Norway.
A group of glacial archaeologists have recovered over 2,000 artifacts
from the edges of Norway¹s glaciers, and the find promises to help
researchers better understand the history of mountain populations.

Archaeologists from the United Kingdom and Norway have surveyed the
edges of glaciers in Norway¹s highest mountains in Oppland since 2011 as
part of the Glacier Archaeology Program and its Secrets of the Ice
Project. They¹ve uncovered thousands of objects that date as far back as
4,000 B.C., including wooden skis, near complete bronze-age arrows and
wooden shafts, Viking swords, clothing and the skulls of pack horses."
Eric Stevens
2018-01-27 23:13:46 UTC
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On Sat, 27 Jan 2018 11:25:35 -0500, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Melting Norwegian glaciers release thousands of artifacts, some trapped
in ice for 6,000 years.
<https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/2000-artifacts-pulled-edge-nor
ways-melting-glaciers-180967949/>
"Glaciers and permafrost hold many of these treasures, but as climate
changes they¹re releasing their haul to the elements. And as Kastalia
Medrano at Newsweek reports, this is exactly what¹s happening in Norway.
A group of glacial archaeologists have recovered over 2,000 artifacts
from the edges of Norway¹s glaciers, and the find promises to help
researchers better understand the history of mountain populations.
Climate changes have nothing much to do with it. Glaciers are giant
conveyors eventually discharging at the bottom whatever was once at
the top.
Post by Horace LaBadie
Archaeologists from the United Kingdom and Norway have surveyed the
edges of glaciers in Norway¹s highest mountains in Oppland since 2011 as
part of the Glacier Archaeology Program and its Secrets of the Ice
Project. They¹ve uncovered thousands of objects that date as far back as
4,000 B.C., including wooden skis, near complete bronze-age arrows and
wooden shafts, Viking swords, clothing and the skulls of pack horses."
I would have expected that they would find more than the skulls of
horses, not to mention the occasional remains of their riders.
--
Regards,

Eric Stevens
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