Discussion:
Archaeologists: Early Europeans Prospered Despite Abrupt Climate Change
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Eric Stevens
2018-04-17 21:42:39 UTC
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"Remains from a 40,000-year-old site have given archaeologists
insight into how our ancestors dealt with prehistoric climate
change.

On a number of occasions throughout humanity’s history, volcanic
“super eruptions” have caused catastrophic changes to weather and
climate with the potential to wipe humans from entire regions.

However, new analysis of a site in Liguria, north west Italy,
suggests our ancestors were able to flourish despite just such a
crisis unfolding nearby. "

https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-first-europeans-survived-volcano-eruption-work-together-italy-liguria-a8306911.html
or https://tinyurl.com/yc2j3qt8
--
Regards,

Eric Stevens
Peter Jason
2018-04-18 03:41:14 UTC
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On Wed, 18 Apr 2018 09:42:39 +1200, Eric Stevens
Post by Eric Stevens
"Remains from a 40,000-year-old site have given archaeologists
insight into how our ancestors dealt with prehistoric climate
change.
On a number of occasions throughout humanity’s history, volcanic
“super eruptions” have caused catastrophic changes to weather and
climate with the potential to wipe humans from entire regions.
However, new analysis of a site in Liguria, north west Italy,
suggests our ancestors were able to flourish despite just such a
crisis unfolding nearby. "
https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-first-europeans-survived-volcano-eruption-work-together-italy-liguria-a8306911.html
or https://tinyurl.com/yc2j3qt8
Of course it's the RATE of change that is important. Anything can
adapt if these's time to do it.
Eric Stevens
2018-04-18 04:31:38 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Peter Jason
On Wed, 18 Apr 2018 09:42:39 +1200, Eric Stevens
Post by Eric Stevens
"Remains from a 40,000-year-old site have given archaeologists
insight into how our ancestors dealt with prehistoric climate
change.
On a number of occasions throughout humanity’s history, volcanic
“super eruptions” have caused catastrophic changes to weather and
climate with the potential to wipe humans from entire regions.
However, new analysis of a site in Liguria, north west Italy,
suggests our ancestors were able to flourish despite just such a
crisis unfolding nearby. "
https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-first-europeans-survived-volcano-eruption-work-together-italy-liguria-a8306911.html
or https://tinyurl.com/yc2j3qt8
Of course it's the RATE of change that is important. Anything can
adapt if these's time to do it.
Rate of change is important but so too is the extent of the change.

One form of reaction to inceasingly cold climates is moving to a
warmer climate. But what happens if you encounter a barrier such as a
range of mountains? What happens if you reach the sea?
--
Regards,

Eric Stevens
Peter Jason
2018-04-19 23:40:08 UTC
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Raw Message
On Wed, 18 Apr 2018 16:31:38 +1200, Eric Stevens
Post by Eric Stevens
Post by Peter Jason
On Wed, 18 Apr 2018 09:42:39 +1200, Eric Stevens
Post by Eric Stevens
"Remains from a 40,000-year-old site have given archaeologists
insight into how our ancestors dealt with prehistoric climate
change.
On a number of occasions throughout humanity’s history, volcanic
“super eruptions” have caused catastrophic changes to weather and
climate with the potential to wipe humans from entire regions.
However, new analysis of a site in Liguria, north west Italy,
suggests our ancestors were able to flourish despite just such a
crisis unfolding nearby. "
https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-first-europeans-survived-volcano-eruption-work-together-italy-liguria-a8306911.html
or https://tinyurl.com/yc2j3qt8
Of course it's the RATE of change that is important. Anything can
adapt if these's time to do it.
Rate of change is important but so too is the extent of the change.
One form of reaction to inceasingly cold climates is moving to a
warmer climate. But what happens if you encounter a barrier such as a
range of mountains? What happens if you reach the sea?
Assuming the change occurs over time greater than a human lifespan
adaption is easier. Younger people are always on the move and less
likely to depend on older traditions. It's hard to see how large
changing weather patterns over time would be severe enough to decimate
a population. Pacific islanders adapted to overcrowding and adverse
politics by "moving on" (besides infanticide).
Eric Stevens
2018-04-20 09:29:27 UTC
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Post by Peter Jason
On Wed, 18 Apr 2018 16:31:38 +1200, Eric Stevens
Post by Eric Stevens
Post by Peter Jason
On Wed, 18 Apr 2018 09:42:39 +1200, Eric Stevens
Post by Eric Stevens
"Remains from a 40,000-year-old site have given archaeologists
insight into how our ancestors dealt with prehistoric climate
change.
On a number of occasions throughout humanity’s history, volcanic
“super eruptions” have caused catastrophic changes to weather and
climate with the potential to wipe humans from entire regions.
However, new analysis of a site in Liguria, north west Italy,
suggests our ancestors were able to flourish despite just such a
crisis unfolding nearby. "
https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change-first-europeans-survived-volcano-eruption-work-together-italy-liguria-a8306911.html
or https://tinyurl.com/yc2j3qt8
Of course it's the RATE of change that is important. Anything can
adapt if these's time to do it.
Rate of change is important but so too is the extent of the change.
One form of reaction to inceasingly cold climates is moving to a
warmer climate. But what happens if you encounter a barrier such as a
range of mountains? What happens if you reach the sea?
Assuming the change occurs over time greater than a human lifespan
adaption is easier. Younger people are always on the move and less
likely to depend on older traditions. It's hard to see how large
changing weather patterns over time would be severe enough to decimate
a population. Pacific islanders adapted to overcrowding and adverse
politics by "moving on" (besides infanticide).
Your answer says nothing about how they behaved when the encpountered
the need to cross mountains or seas.
--
Regards,

Eric Stevens
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